Hygge lievig room scene

Hygge

As the nights draw in, and Christmas approaches, at the lighting design studio we’re firing up the wood burner, lighting candles, and starting to feel more hygge. Hygge, a Danish concept, is growing in popularity throughout the world, particularly here in the UK. As lighting designers, a sense of Hygge is never far from our minds when we’re designing lighting schemes for our residential projects, particularly for the soft light scenes in bedrooms, bathrooms, and snugs. Hygge’, pronounced ‘heurgha’ or ‘Hooga’ has no official english translation. It’s a feeling, or an atmosphere. The concept  involves you allowing yourself to appreciate the small things life has to offer, as well as experiencing more cosy moments at home. Sometimes referred to ‘cosiness of the soul’ or ‘the absence of annoyance’. It’s a sense of togetherness, relaxation and comfort. Danish people put this down to a growing awareness of the decoupling between wealth and well-being. They agree that more money does not necessarily lead to happiness and they are renown for being one of the happiest nations in the world. Why is this? Well perhaps it’s because they’re particularly good at ‘hygge’, just look at the obscene quantities of candles they use. 28% of Danes light candles every day. 31% of them lighting more than 5 at once.

So how can we bring hygge moments into our homes?

Lighting of course is paramount. To create a warm and cosy atmosphere it’s not just about candles, cosy socks, and a mug of coco; It’s crucial to get the lighting in general right. Selecting lamps carefully and placing them strategically to create pools of light. It’s no coincidence that some of the most beautifully designed lamps in the world come from Danish designers. Poul Henningsen, Arne Jacobsen, and Verner Panton to name a few. We advocate 5 amp power sockets for floor and table lamps, which give the ability to turn your lamps on at the wall with a light switch or control system, making them an integral part of the lighting in your room. You also need to consider the colour temperature (warmth or coolness) of the light. The lower the colour temperature the more hygge. 6500 – 5500 Kelvin (k) is typically the colour of daylight on an overcast day. 4000k is generally the colour of white light in most of our offices. 3000k is typical of halogen light sources, and candles are 1800k. We suggest going for 2700k light sources, or even using the 2200k ‘vintage style’ led filament light bulbs in your floor and table lamps. The key is to create low level pools of very warm light. For help to make the lighting in your home more ‘hygge’ this winter, feel free to get in touch.